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Here Are the 2018 National Book Award Winners

Find out the greatest works of the year.

A fixture of the literary world since 1950, the National Book award honors the strongest writing in America. Qualifications necessary to win the award are simple: the book has to have been published no earlier than December 1st of the previous year, and the author must be a U.S. citizen by any possible means. Then there's the most important rule of all—it has to be the best. Judges have now announced this year's five winners across five categories.

 

Fiction: The Friend

 

'The Friend' by Sigrid Nunez

 

Sigrid Nunez has always been a literary heavy-hitter. A winner of the Whiting Writer's Award, Berlin Prize Fellowship, and the Rome Prize in literature, Nunez has also been a professor at a veritable collection of top institutions—Columbia, Princeton, and The New School. The Friend was one of the most-anticipated releases of 2018, topping Buzzfeed, Bustle, BookRiot, and PopSugar's lists.

 

After a woman loses her closest friend, she's left with only two things: the burden of her grief... and his massive, traumatized dog. In her self-imposed isolation, the woman spirals into obsession over the dog's care—the one thing that she can still control. It's possible this could heal her... it's possible it could tear her apart. Enter the realm of magical thinking. Nunez writes: "what we miss - what we lose and what we mourn - isn't it this that makes us who, deep down, we truly are? To say nothing of what we wanted in life but never got to have."

 

Nonfiction: The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke

 

'The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke' by Jeffrey C. Stewart

 

Jeffrey C. Stewart's groundbreaking biography chronicles the life and influence of black intellectual Alain Locke, the oft-cited originator of the Harlem Renaissance. Locke's achievements are innumerable, but historians can list more than a few—he became the first black Rhodes Scholar in 1907, earned a PhD from Harvard University, and quickly became the philosophy chair at Howard University. As a member of the homosexual community, Locke also embraced the progressive and avant-garde.

 

His anthology The New Negro, a collection of poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction, remains a landmark historical work. Biographer Stewart is also an impressive character—a Yale PhD recipient currently serving as a professor at University of California at Santa Barbara. He has also taught at Harvard University and Howard University. Stewart's The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke uses newly-available primary sources and oral interviews to pay tribute to one of history's greatest minds. Stewart also draws attention to thinkers academia often neglects—the gay and gender-nonconforming activists of the Harlem Renaissance. 

 

Poetry: Indecency

 

'Indecency' by Justin Phillip Reed

 

Justin Phillip Reed's collection, Indecency, is as intimate as it is confrontational. Reed blends the political and personal in his exploration of sexuality, masculinity, and the prison-industrial complex. A graduate of the top-10 MFA program at the Washington University in St. Louis, Reed considers "any kind of history—especially concerning Black folks—to always be on the edge of being obliterated" in cities like his own St. Louis, with 'progress' often dismantling already-thriving communities of color.

 

A "most indecent black queer poet" himself, he probes topics ranging from race to sex in poems titled "Performing a Warped Masculinity En Route to the Metro" and other biting things. According to Reed, the cover art is, in fact, a photo of bird sh!t.

 

Translation: The Emissary

 

'The Emissary' by Yoko Tawada, translated by Margaret Mitsutani

 

The first winner of the Book Award's newest category of Translated Literature, American-born Margaret Mitsutani has been living in Japan since the late 1970s. Mitsutani won the National Book Award for her translation of Yoko Tadawa's The Emissarya satirical depiction of an isolationist Japan in the aftermath of unspecified nuclear catastrophe. Tokyo is a radioactive no-man's-land, and society moves to outer cities like Osaka and Hokkaido, where the robust elderly occupy all government positions—a clear commentary on Japan's declining birthrate.

 

Japan's sealed borders further serve to comment on the sweeping populist and nationalist movements of recent years. Critics describe Mitsutani's translation as "playful, powerful, and wise."

 

Young Adult People's Literature: The Poet X

 

'The Poet X' by Elizabeth Acevedo

 

Winning a National Book Award for her debut novel is hardly Elizabeth Acevedo's only significant accomplishment. As a National Poetry Slam Champion, Acevedo clearly conveys her passion and expert knowledge in prizewinning novel The Poet X. Xiomara Batista is an anomaly in her Harlem community, born to seriously advanced-in-years parents who tout her birth as the kind of miracle their religious devotion incurs—the kind of miracle Xiomara has never believed in. When the rules of religion silence Xiomara, she uses slam poetry to regain her voice.

 

The novel has a true poet's touch: it contains three sections of verse, all with Biblical titles juxtaposing the structure of religion with Xiomara's disbelief. Acevedo says that her experience as an eighth-grade teacher inspired her to write the novel. One Latina student said of contemporary literature: "These books aren’t about us. [These characters] don’t look like us... they don’t walk through the world like us. These ain’t our books.” Now, Acevedo has created a book that is.

 

 

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