5 Books Stephen King Thinks You Should Read

Grab the works that inspired the master.

5 Books Stephen King Thinks You Should Read

Stephen King has written some of the most popular stories of the past five decades. He has over 50 literary awards, including prestige honors like the O. Henry Prize, Shirley Jackson Award, and the National Medal of Arts. 

As an esteemed writer, we trust his literary opinions. Check out the books that the master of horror lists as his favorites. 

1.The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Twain deeply influenced modern American literature: King is not immune to his grasp. King claims that reading Twain was his “First appreciation of human nature" in literature. After finishing The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, King then went on devouring the rest of Twain's catalog. 

2) The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie

Rushdie's fourth book is largely known for its controversy, yet this is a story of substance. The book was banned and burned throughout Muslim communities and the head of Iran called for Rushdie’s head because of the portrayal of Muhammad. Despite the outrage, it’s a great novel that was nominated for the Man Booker prize -- a funny yet surreal journey of two people trying to put their life back together. 

3) The Lord of the Flies by William Golding

King loves this staple of high school reading so much that he wrote the introduction for a reprinting. In the introductory essay, he discusses how he first chose the book out of a Bookmobile. He goes on to talk about how the story shows the many sides of children: “Could we be good? Yes. Could we be kind? Yes again. Could we, at the turn of a moment, become little monsters? Indeed we could.” Golding’s novel has accurate portrayals of children mixed with the fear and freedom that comes with a grand journey.

4) Bleak House by Charles Dickens

King likes Dickens for his multiple characters and extensive storylines, a staple of King's work as well. Dickens’ influence on King is apparent as they are constantly compared. Bleak House may be Dickens’ most encompassing work with over 60 chapters and multiple subplots. 

5) Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy

The other living master of dread and horror’s magnum opus, Blood Meridian, is a modern masterpiece. A brutal and unforgiving journey through the battleground of Texas and Mexico filled with one of the most haunting villains of all-time, The Judge. If you’re a fan of Stephen King’s horror don’t forget to read this towering terror epic. 

 

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