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10 Books to Read as You Head Back to School

School days are better when you have a good book to read

Well, kids, we hope you had a good summer. September is here, and your time is up: you’ll have to head back to school. Don’t worry too much, though. School has its ups and downs, but we're here with a list of all the books you’ll need to get through it. These are the great works of fiction that will remind you of the good things about school while preparing you for the bad. We’ve got options for all ages here, so dive in - and leave your own suggestions in the comments!

 

Carrie by Stephen King

There are plenty of coming-of-age stories on this list, so let’s start with something completely different. Carrie is Stephen King’s first novel, and it’s the ultimate high school horror story. If you thought the first day of school was scary before, just wait until you read this book.

 

Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney 

Kinney’s relatable and charming series is aimed at middle schoolers. The first book is a funny and honest look at what it’s like to head back to school as a pre-teen, and the rest of the series handles everything else that the main character, Greg Heffley, faces as he grows up: puberty, life with siblings, summer jobs, and more. September is the perfect time to start this wonderful series.

 

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Real-life school can be a big of a drag, so we’re including the boy wizard here to spice things up. Each Harry Potter book spans one schools year, so now is a good time to re-read your favorite. And if you’ve never read Harry Potter before, then consider this your first assignment of the school year.

 

I’ll Take You There by Joyce Carol Oates 

Joyce Carol Oates is one of our greatest living writers, and I’ll Take You There is her take on college life. Like Oates herself, the book’s protagonist attends Syracuse University in upstate New York. The book doesn’t pull any punches as it tackles race, family matters, and love.

 

The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides

Here’s one for the college kids. Eugenides’ great novel follows students at Brown University during their senior year. The novel continues after they graduate, so this is  a story that will stay with you even after your own school days are over.

 

Matilda by Roald Dahl

If you think your school is bad, wait until you read about Matilda’s! Roald Dahl’s books for young readers always include cruel adults and admirable child protagonists, which makes books like Matilda the perfect way to enjoy a feel-good story even as you’re forced to go back to school. Grab this book and remind yourself that getting an education is all about kid power.

 

No More Dead Dogs by Gordon Korman

Take a break from the more serious books on this list with Gordon Korman, one of the funniest writers in the business. No More Dead Dogs is the hilarious story of a student who is up in arms about all the dead dogs in books like Old Yeller. Korman’s comedy will make the start of school a bit more tolerable. 

 

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a modern classic. It’s a coming-of-age story that follows Charlie, a shy teenager, through his freshman year of high school. Chbosky doesn’t shy away from the real issues of teenage life, including depression, drug use, and sexuality.

 

The Secret History by Donna Tartt

Tartt’s collegiate classic is a creative take on a murder mystery. The story starts by revealing the murder and then rewinds, covering the history of a small group of college friends and the impact of the crime on each of them. Hopefully your school year will go more smoothly than this!

 

A Separate Peace by John Knowles

You may end up reading this novel during the school year whether you want to or not: Knowles’ classic novel of memory and school days is often required reading in American high schools. But this book is worthy of its place in the curriculum. Set against the backdrop of World War II, it mixes real-world politics with the familiar drama of school-age friendships.

 

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